Conventions planning in Quebec. |

1 888 969-1307
Beauce Le Georgesville, Saint-Georges-de-Beauce
Bromont
Charlevoix (C) Vincent Guérin, Tourisme Charlevoix
Côte-Nord
Drummondville
Gatineau-Outaouais Andrew Van Beek
Granby Mario Landry
Îles de la Madeleine Michel Bonato
Lac-Saint-Jean
Lanaudière
Laurentians
Laval Jimmy Hamelin
Lévis Pub Photo
Maskinongé (Mauricie)
Matane Studio du Ruisseau
Memphrémagog
Montérégie
Montréal Tourisme Montréal, Stéphan Poulin
Nicolet-Yamaska André Falardeau
Québec François Gamache
Rimouski
Rivière-du-Loup
Saguenay (C) Martial Tremblay
Saint-Hyacinthe Patrick Roger
Shawinigan
Sherbrooke
Thetford Nadeau Photo Solution
Tremblant (Laurentians) @tremblant
Trois-Rivières Jean Chamberland
Victoriaville Guy Samson
30 destinations for your business events!
QACP - Quebec Association of Convention Professionals Toll free: 1 888 969-1307
Phone: 450 969-1307
Website : www.congres.com
Mail : info@congres.com

9 Wrong Ways to Ask Event Survey Questions

9 Wrong Ways to Ask Event Survey Questions

March 4, 2019

The motto "there are no bad questions" does not apply to surveys. There is definitely a right and wrong way to ask attendees for feedback.

The wrong way can confuse and annoy attendees - and ultimately lead to them giving up on your survey. It can also affect the accuracy of the answers you get. If you're getting biased answers - and making critical changes to your events as a result - it could seriously undermine the success of your future events.

Here are nine common mistakes the SurveyMonkey team sees event creators often make with event survey questions, and how to correct them so you receive helpful results.

1. Asking leading questions

You're not trying to convince attendees to say they liked your event. You're an earnest event creator looking for authentic input. So don't "lead the witness" by trying to put words in attendees' mouths. Instead, ask questions that leave room for an honest response.

Pro tip: If your multiple-choice or dropdown list doesn't offer the option they're looking for, they might get discouraged. To gather accurate and enthusiastic answers, set survey-takers up for success with an "other" option, even for something as seemingly straightforward as gender.

2. Asking loaded questions

Don't assume anything about your attendees experience - for example, that the attendee drove a car to your event. It makes answering difficult and confusing, particularly if they're pressured to answer the question before moving to the next.

Pro tip: If you still want to know where the car-drivers parked, use a nifty trick SurveyMonkey calls "skip logic." This mechanism allows you to show people only the questions that are relevant to them. For instance:

Skip logic helps keep your event survey as short as possible, and as relevant to each individual as possible, too.

3. Asking double-barreled questions

In your attempts to keep your survey short and sweet, don't fall into the trap of trying to lump two different questions into one.

It's entirely possible your staff was friendly, yet not professional, or vice versa.

4. Asking absolutes in questions

When you force respondents to reply that they "always" or "never" do something, you risk inaccurate answers. People are complex, and their behavior is not always consistent. Don't raise the stakes by making them take a stand.

5. Using jargony language

Don't assume your survey takers are hip to the latest acronyms and technology verbiage. Use clear, simple language that everyone will understand.

6. Asking overly personal questions

People are less likely to answer questions that feel encroaching or threatening. Instead, ask questions that give you precise information without being creepy.

7. Burying your lede

In journalism parlance, "burying your lede" means failing to emphasize the key to the story up front. You have to capture people quickly if you want them to pay attention.

Similarly, SurveyMonkey suggests asking your most important survey question first. In fact, they suggest you include that question right in the email itself. That "lede" question should be both easy and compelling to answer, for instance:

Overall, how satisfied were you with this event?

Placing your first survey question in the email is a practice that can increase your opens by up to 22% and the number of people who finish your survey by 20%.

8. Trying to jam a bunch of questions onto one screen

Fewer questions on each page is survey best practice. SurveyMonkey recommends one to five questions, max.

Since SurveyMonkey captures the data every time the user clicks "next," this practice ensures you record as many answers as possible, even when attendees don't complete the full survey.

9. Forgetting about your brand voice

If your buttoned-up brand suddenly starts using hipster slang in survey copy, people will wonder whether you've been brand-snatched.

The more consistent you are in your language and tone across every platform, the more recognizable and friendly your "brand voice" becomes.

Source: Eventbrite


More news RSS



Quebec Association of Convention Professionals

toll free 1 888 969-1307
Phone 450 969-1307


Tourisme Québec ADN communication Clientis Alliance industrie touristique du Quebec

All rights reserved © 2010-2019 Quebec Association of Convention Professionals

Website Design & Web Hosting Provider ADN communication Website Design Génome :: Content Management System